le Gave de Pau – torrent bleu pyrénéen…:-)

au début de la randonnée, le Gave de Pau était couvert d’une brume épaisse qui s’est dissipée avant d’arriver au cirque de Gavarnie… un sentier égaré dans un monde mystérieux, mais le soleil est sorti, et j’ai aperçu des iris, 2 géranium cendrés, des lys – espèces endémiques des Pyrénées et des monts Cantabriques… beauté vénusienne embrassée par la rosée de l’aube, “yin & yang” – indissociables et nécessaires à l’harmonie et à l’équilibre – paradis terrestre, joie intense, rêve d’éternité… 🙂
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N.B. @ le Gave de Pau – le torrent de Gavarnie… Le terme “gave” signifie “un cours d’eau” dans les Pyrénées occidentales. Il s’agit d’un hydronyme pré-celtique désignant de manière générale un torrent ou une rivière de montagne.

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at the beginning of the hike, the Gave de Pau stream was covered with a thick mist that vanished before reaching Gavarnie… a lost trail across a mysterious realm, until the sun came out, and I caught sight of the irises, lilies, and 2 butternut geraniums – endemic species of the Pyrénées and the Cantabrian Mountains… Venusian beauty, kissed by the dew of dawn, inseparable and necessary “yin & yang” to harmony and balance – earthly heaven, deep joy, dream of eternity… 🙂
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N.B. @ Gave de Pau – Gavarnie’s Pyrenean blue stream… The word “gave” is mostly used in the western Pyrénées and it means “watercourse”. It’s a pre-Celtic hydronym and it generally designates a “mountain river or stream”.

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About Mél@nie

https://myvirtualplayground.wordpress.com/about/ Mélanie Bedos-Toulouse @ Facebook

Posted on 13 July 2015, in melanie. Bookmark the permalink. 15 Comments.

  1. Superbe sensation de fraîcheur en regardant tes photos… Bises!

  2. Bien joli tout ça… une fois de plus, pour notre plus grand plaisir!

  3. So lovely as ever. Particularly welcome are the brilliant pictures of water… it is SO dry here… the littlest ruisseaux are gone and even the bigger rivers are virtually dry. I am always interested in the local idiosyncracies of language, too! 🙂

  4. Merveilleuses photos Mélanie, j’aime tes iris. Belle soirée à toi.

  5. your words always match the beauty!

  6. Tiny wild iris grow in the woods and along creek banks by the hundreds here in middle Tennessee. It’s the state flower. They are one of my favorite things along with yellow daffodils. I so wish I had been able to travel to places like this in Pyrenees, when I was young and able to hike in the woods and hills. But I was fortunate in having my own Winnie the Pooh, hundred acre wood with woods, hills, fields, and a beautiful clear creek with fossils of coral from when Tennessee was under an ocean and amazing wild flowers. I spent days exploring it in each season and camped out with the children under the stars, even in the snow sometimes. Nature is my cathedral. You are so fortunate to have such beauty all around you and be able to explore it. Thanks for sharing so much of this with me, who won’t be able to explore it freely as you do.

    • it’s not a question of being “fortunate”, but a matter of mutual choices and decisions…
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      @”Nature is my cathedral.” – same here, Eileen: we do worship Lady Nature… 🙂
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      you’re welcome… ❤

  7. Beautiful, beautiful, beautiful.

  8. C’est marrant pour le mot “gave”, en patois Mauriennais, on a le mot goye ou goille, je ne sais pas comment cela s’écrit, pour designer une mare ou un petit plan d’eau naturelle, où on allait attraper les grenouilles et les têtards.

  9. We have irises similar to these in our garden. Truly beautiful!

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